Snoring and the affect on a good nights sleep

Snoring
There are many factors that affect sleep and snoring can be one. Whether you snore or not can depend on a range of factors from your size, your nose and throat health, whether you smoke and how big your neck is amongst other things. Often snoring can be caused by the weight around the neck area which can sometimes restrict your airway making it more difficult to get air into your lungs. Anything that might restrict air getting into your lungs while sleeping may cause you to snore an also have a negative affect on your sleep.

Generally a small amount of snoring is not going to cause a major problem and even babies snore. If snoring becomes heavy this where it can cause major problems. In some cases severe snoring will wake up the sleeper. This usually happens with a kind of gagging sound in the breathing as the person gasps for breath. This can happen as much as 100 times in one hour without the sleeper noticing as we have to be awake for more than 30 seconds to remember that we were actually awake. This is one reason why we can feel that we had a good night sleep, but still feel sleepy.

To reduce snoring it’s good to avoid sleeping on your back as it can accentuate the problem. It’s worth trying to sleep in a variety of positions to see which works best for you. Some people take sleeping pills thinking this can prevent snoring through a better more deep sleep, but it can actually worsen the symptoms. Sleeping pills will relax the body and particularly neck muscles, which increases snoring in most cases. Sleeping pills are considered ineffective to combat snoring and if you think snoring is a problem for you it’s recommended to seek advice from your doctor.

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Snoring is the vibration of respiratory structures and the resulting sound, due to obstructed air movement during breathing while sleeping. In some cases the sound may be soft, but in other cases, it can be loud and unpleasant. Snoring during sleep may be a sign, or first alarm, of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Source: Wikipedia

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